Sailors tackle the choppy waters of Tauranga Harbour

Up to 75 sailors with disabilities have now signed up to tackle the choppy waters of Tauranga Harbour with Sailability Tauranga.

The group was formed in 2016 by former Tauranga Yacht and Power Boat Club Commodore Peter Dallimore, now Chairman of the Sailablity Tauranga Charitable Trust. They now have a small fleet – Hansa class 303 boats – and 50 volunteers committed to giving people with disabilities the opportunity to sail.

Early in May 2018, the group held its first Sailors Award Ceremony. Sailors were awarded certificates for individual achievements, such as courage, perseverance, taking the helm, regular attendance and going solo.

“For some, just getting into a boat was a challenge, to steer a boat an even bigger achievement and to sail solo is a massive step forward. It gives us all a great sense of fulfilment and joy to see the beaming smiles of our sailors as they come back into the dock after an hour on the water,” Peter says.

Since Sailability Tauranga purchased its own sailing dinghies in late 2017, it has been able to offer group bookings to community organisations. Of its 75 registered sailors, half sail on a regular basis. They come from a variety of organisations, including IHC/IDEA Services, The Blind Foundation, The Stroke Foundation, Tauranga Special School, Geneva Health and many privately enrolled sailors. 

Rhonda Ritchie, the Club Captain, says the group sails on four days each month in summer and for two days a month in winter. Each session is an hour long. On top of that, it runs a separate programme for schools. It has recently engaged with three secondary school special education units. Trial sailing days have been held with the view to channelling the students either into its regular sailing programme or setting up regular schools sailing days. 

Expanding its sailing opportunities in the future depends on being able to recruit and train suitable volunteers to operate safely on Tauranga Harbour’s exposed and challenging environment. “We do not have any sheltered sailing areas so our current fleet is always accompanied by at least two patrol boats requiring two crew members each and we will have to add a further patrol boat as our numbers increase.”

Funding provided by the IHC Foundation has helped to provide safety equipment, including a RIB (rigid inflatable boat) and motors.

New approach to gene testing provides answers for families

A new approach to genetic testing funded by the IHC Foundation has provided diagnoses of rare genetic conditions for 11 New Zealand families so far, with more positive results expected from a pilot programme.

A research team, led by Professor Russell Snell, Dr Jessie Jacobsen and Associate Professor Klaus Lehnert at the University of Auckland, used the latest genome sequencing technology to look for a genetic diagnosis for children with undiagnosed, rare neurodevelopmental disorders.

Twenty families from throughout New Zealand participated in a two-year pilot study to discover the genes responsible for disorders that couldn’t be explained through standard tests. The team hoped to provide answers for at least 10 of the 20 families but the results are even more encouraging.

Of the 20 families, researchers discovered the gene or mutation responsible for the condition in 11 individuals. These results will now be confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory and clinicians will discuss treatment options and other implications with the families.

The results from a further seven families are still being analysed but Russell says he is optimistic that they will be able to provide a diagnosis for at least half of these families.

Researchers were not able to provide a diagnosis for two families, but Jessie says the team has no plans to give up and will now look for more complex causes. She says they will look for things like deletions or duplications or more complex breaks in the chromosomal material.

“Sometimes I underestimate how brilliant it is to be able to provide a family with a diagnosis. Having an answer can be a real relief for the family,” she says. For families dealing with very rare conditions, it means they can connect with others elsewhere in the world for support and to share information. For others it will mean the end of a long ‘diagnostic odyssey’ to get an answer, or to know whether or not it is an inherited condition.

Russell says the team is achieving results with their streamlined sequencing process as good, if not better, than anywhere else in the world. “We are quite good at this. Most people use a simplified process that struggles to discover the very rare disorders.”

He says their process is more cost-effective than standard tests that screen gene by gene. The team sequences the whole genome of the affected individual but only 1 percent of the DNA (the exome) of the parents. Sequencing the exome – the protein-coding regions – is about half the cost of sequencing the genome. The exome is thought to harbour about 85 percent of DNA variations that cause disease. Their aim is to provide evidence to the Ministry of Health that this is the best clinical approach to genetic testing.

“It will simplify clinical genetics in the broader sense. If you do what we are doing you can replace all the clinical genetic tests with this single test – that is, sequence the genome and evaluate that. Because it’s simpler it will be more efficient and it will be cheaper in the long run. “It is of course hugely dependent on having biology experts with computer skills who can relate findings to the biology and we are very fortunate in having Klaus in our team.”

Former IHC Foundation Chair Sir Roderick Deane says the result of the research is great news. “I cannot tell you how pleased I am with the quality of this work and its outcomes. For parents to know what the problem is becomes hugely important to the families. “In the case of my wife Gillian and me, very many years ago, we did not know about our daughter Kristen having Rett syndrome until she was well into her teens. It was an agony not understanding.

“Some so-called specialists had the gall to tell us it was our ‘fault’ and others totally misled us with wrong diagnoses. In contrast, other medical people were marvellously supportive but did not know what the problem was. Then the specialist in the United States whom we saw wrote to us after we had returned to New Zealand and said she had just heard Andreas Rett talk at a conference and she immediately knew she had a patient with the syndrome. Even today, it moves me to think about it and what that information meant to us.”

Dr Juliet Taylor, Clinical Geneticist at Genetic Health Service New Zealand, says without this research many of the families would not have had access to the type of genetic testing that had the great chance of making a diagnosis. “The benefits of getting a diagnosis for these families are immense and include changes in medical management and/or reproductive options becoming available. Just as important, these families find out the reason why, and the benefit of this, for parents in particular, can never be discounted even many years after the birth of a child.”

The IHC Foundation funded the $147,000 cost of collecting and reading the DNA.

Gene researchers seek cause of rare disorders

When it started to rain there was standing room only

When it started to rain there was standing room only in the covered venues at InterACT 2017. But that was perfect.

It meant the workshops and classes at the annual disability arts festival at the Corbans Estate Arts Centre in Henderson were full of festival-goers wanting to have a go at the activities on offer.

In 2017, the IHC Foundation provided funding to Interacting Theatre to run InterACT2017 – a three-day festival showcasing performances, classes and workshops in Auckland. The Foundation has supported the festival since 2011.

The festival was held for the seventh year running in October-November. It attracted 4800 visitors over three days, there were 29 performances on the main stage, a wearable-arts parade each day and a display of artwork by more than 40 exhibitors.

Interacting Trust Chair Rod Wills said the wet weather on two days kept more festival -goers inside, who became the informal audiences for many of the workshops and drop-in sessions. Workshops were held in drumming, dance, clowning, hip-hop, looped recording music-making and masks. There were also drop-in sessions where participants could make comics and a poetry zine. Drop-in sessions included jewellery-making, face-painting and costuming.

Interacting community filmmaker Hank Snell made a documentary during the festival, assisted by festival participants.

Festival Director Paula Crimmens says the event is well-supported by special schools and disability providers. “It’s a great vibe. The atmosphere is terrific – it’s very affirming. When people ask, ‘Shall I perform?’ I say you will kick yourself if you don’t.”

Paula is now looking for performers to sign up for InterACT2018, which will be held at the same venue from 31 October to 2 November 2018. Email her on interactfest@gmail.com or phone 09 8495595.

For expressions of interest, go to www.tinyurl.com/interactfest18 

InterACT 2016 - Community showcase in sixth year

InterACT 2015 - Disability festival attracts crowds

Open studio brings museum to life

A group of artists has taken up residence in the foyer of Te Manawa museum in Palmerston North to share their creativity with each other and with visitors and tourists alike.

They are part of NOA Open Studio, which opened towards the end of 2016 with funding from the IHC Foundation. It is one way in which the museum, art gallery and science centre is bringing the life of the community inside the building.

Chief Executive Andy Lowe says Te Manawa has a concept called ‘museum without boundaries’. “It’s about mixing it up and breaking down the barriers. We want to bring people who are often invisible and make them visible in our environment,” he says.

He says the IHC Foundation funding had “put wings on an idea” by enabling Te Manawa to really explore what it means to be inclusive.

NOA Arts Facilitator Aroha Lowe, his wife, has had a long involvement with outsider artists, with artists who have disabilities, with the elderly and with children. She says NOA is about sharing and inhabiting public space to create art together.

“The right of citizenship means that we can move through public spaces. We are part of things that go on. Te Manawa is funded by the ratepayer and anyone can come here, but some people have been under-represented,” she says.

“I was raised by my father who was disabled. He was seriously injured in a traffic accident when I was three – hit by a vehicle when he was walking across a crossing in Auckland. My mother had died of cancer just months before this. So, my father, post-coma, had to learn to talk and walk again.

“He was my hero, in that everyday, just-my-Dad kind of way, and I learned a great deal from him about bravery as he struggled through what was largely difficult terrain for a disabled father. We used to visit galleries, museums, shops etc before there were wheelchairs and other supports available,” she says.

“He would love Te Manawa. There are chairs just inside the door – wheelchairs available. The floor is level, the spaces accessible; the toilets too, of course. Staff are friendly and welcoming of those of us with disabilities.”

 Artist and DJ Anaru Davis is a regular at NOA Open Studio, which operates from the foyer of Te Manawa museum in Palmerston North

Artist and DJ Anaru Davis is a regular at NOA Open Studio, which operates from the foyer of Te Manawa museum in Palmerston North

Aroha says NOA stands for Notes Of Art. Noa is also a Māori word that can mean open, safe or free from restriction. “In Te Ao Māori, through powhiri, karanga, karakia and whaikorero, we use ritual to establish safety, to allow for each other’s difference and to find common ground,” she says.

The sessions are mixed ability and for all ages. “It’s about whoever is here on the day. People come in with clear ideas and it might be a very solitary experience. Other people come in and see who’s here and it might be a very organic thing,” she says. Also welcome are tourists, kids with their grandmas or caregivers, known and emerging artists, and visitors waiting for exhibition queues to clear.